Latin Dance Videos: Bolero, Tango, Samba, Salsa

The Latin dance videos in this article include clips of rumba bolero, tango, Brazilian tango and salsa. These dance genres originated in Latin America. Generally, these countries speak Spanish or Portuguese and extend from the Southern part of North America through Central and South America. Other Latin American countries include Venezuela, Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Cuba, Mexico and Peru. Latin dance music originated in these Latin American countries but were influenced with African rhythms from the slaves. Also, there were influences from the indigenous people of the region.

Argentine Tango (Forever Tango Show)

Forever Tango – A Evaristo Carriego by Marcela Duran& Carlos Gavito

The original tango started in Argentina and then traveled around the world evolving into unique alternate forms in different countries.  Meanwhile, ballroom dancers and studios in the United States developed the American style tango. Also, this style of tango incorporated patterns and movements from the very popular foxtrot.

In Europe, the International style tango developed with partners maintaining contact and a staccato head snap, later adapted for dance sport. An Argentine tango show traveled around the world and brought the original style for tango back in many places in the 1980’s. One can find all three styles of tango in the United States. In addition, there are also different arenas of tango including performance, social and competition. The video clip in this article gives us a glimpse of a dramatic tango performance.

Bolero (Rumba) (Latin Dance Videos)

Bruno Collins & Luann Pulliam – Bolero Dance

Bolero (rumba) evolved from earlier dance forms in Spain and Cuba from the 18th century. Generally, the bolero is danced to slower Latin music while the American style box rumba uses faster music (96 to 120 beats per minute). The bolero is infused with movements from the faster rumba but also tango and waltz. Also, it incorporates hip movement plus rise and fall. American Rhythm used in American style competition are cha cha, box rumba, mambo,  East Coast swing  and bolero.

Brazilian Samba Team – (Latin Dance Videos)

Nuroc – Best of the Best 2013- Latin Dance Australia – Samba Pro Team

The Samba dance genre developed some time in the late nineteenth century in Brazil.  Samba music has African drum rhythms. Meanwhile, there are many different types of samba in Brazil and other places. In the United States, the American ballroom samba is popular. In the United Kingdom, the International style samba is more common. Other variations include Gafiera, samba pagode and samba rock. Generally, the samba uses a pulse body movement in synchrony with the pulsing rhythms in the music.

Watch another Brazilian Samba Performance here.

Salsa Team – Latin dance video clip

Island Touch Performance Salsa Team 2010 @New York Salsa Congress

In the United States, the most popular dance is the Salsa with bachata taking a close second place. Salsa is related to the Latin dance genres, mambo and cha cha. It originated in the late 1970’s to early 1980’s and has continued in popularity ever since. In recent years, there has been a salsa movement promoting “salsa on 2.” Salsa in past years has normally put the initial break step on count one. The “on 2” enthusiasts like to break on count 2. Subsequently, this alters the timing to create a new style of salsa dancing.

Watch more Latin dancing including salsa here!


LDC Latin Dance Community website


2017-06-28T21:53:41+00:00 By |Categories: Dance|Tags: , , , |

About the Author:

Currently, Pattie produces article and video blogs for her world dance website, and blogs for her new writing resource website at She is also working on completing a linked stories novel and translating a book of Italian poetry by Eugenio Montale. Pattie writes web content for a limited number of clients and still teaches a few private dance lessons exclusively in San Diego, California where she currently resides.

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